2016 Media


BBC, Richard Westcott – 8 December 2016

Travel study reveals changing behaviour among young and old

A major new study into how people travel around England shows a big difference between the generations. Young people increasingly are ditching the car, whilst older people, especially women, drive more than ever. The Independent Transport Commission (ITC) also found that people are making fewer trips than they did twenty years ago, but those trips are longer. Men under 35 are the most likely to shun the car, whilst women over 60 are driving more than ever. One of the authors, Dr Matthew Niblett, director of the ITC, says: “This report uncovers seismic shifts in patterns of individual travel behaviour.”


Transport Xtra, Deniz Huseyin – 8 December 2016

Younger adults turning away from the car, says ITC report

(Subscription required) Car use among younger men has dropped significantly over the past 20 years, a new study by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) has revealed. The number of miles driven by men in the 17 – 34 age group has fallen 47%, the study found. Over the same period their use of rail has increased by 49% while there has been an 11% increase in journeys by bike and a 4% fall in journeys on foot.


Highways – 8 December 2016

Research shows inter-generational differences in transport behaviour

A new study into transport preferences has found individual car use is decreasing among younger people (under-35s), while rail ridership is increasing across all age groups, in spite of the 2008 financial crash and above-inflation rail ticket costs. The Independent Transport Commission looked at at 1995-2014 data to produce its report “Recent trends in road and rail travel: What do they tell us? On the Move 2 (1995-2014): Overview and policy analysis”.  The paper was based on research commissioned from experts Gordon Stokes and Peter Headicar . Using National Travel Survey data, the findings identify the pattern of road and rail travel trends in England between 1995 and 2014.  The study updates two previous reports into travel trends up to 2007 and a parallel study on related attitudinal trends.


Admiral – 8 December 2016

Changing driving behaviour among both young and old revealed

A recent study by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) shows new trends in how people travel around England. It’s shown that fewer young people are using cars to get around, while older people are driving more than ever. The study also shows that more women over 60 are driving their cars more frequently, while men under 35 are more likely to steer away from using cars.


Daily Mail, Nick Enoch – 3 November 2016

A return to Euston, please: Britain’s ‘first great railway monument’ set to rise again after nearly 60 years as Government declares war on the ‘cult of ugliness’ in modern public buildings

Mr Hayes, who is responsible for Highways England, said there is ‘something profoundly elitist’ about the way that ‘ugliness has been imposed’ upon transport architecture. He also warned of the ‘descendants of the brutalists [who] still each day design and build new horrors from huge concrete slabs’.’ We have a precious opportunity to do more and do better. Transport is the perfect medium for leading the way to the public realm of the beautiful,’ he told the Independent Transport Commission this week.


Daily Mail, Press Association – 2 November 2016

Road and rail constructors urged to take the scenic route for travellers

Road and rail infrastructure should be “beautiful”, a transport minister has claimed. John Hayes, the minister responsible for Highways England, said there is ” something profoundly elitist” about the way that “ugliness has been imposed” upon transport architecture. But the current investment in transport projects, such as HS2, Crossrail and new roads, “offers a way forward”, Mr Hayes told the Independent Transport Commission.


Infrastructure Intelligence, Keith Mitchell – 31 May 2016

Stations can provide a platform for growth – if plans are realistic

Are station development zones the answer to regeneration? Keith Mitchell examines the promise and challenges of the rail-led approach. We have read much about rail-led development recently. First came the Outer London Commission report, Accommodating London’s Growth, which identified development around public transport corridors and hubs as a major opportunity to intensify land use.


Mass Transit Network – 20 May 2016

‘HS2 Ready’: think tank report issues call-to-arms on regeneration through high-speed rail

A new report by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) setting out the regeneration and transport benefits of high-speed rail (HSR) was launched in Leeds  (10.30, 16 May 2016) with The Rt Hon Patrick McLoughlin MP, Secretary of State for Transport. The ITC has been running a major research project investigating howHS2 will shape the country’s cities and regions. Following a programme of regional seminars and workshops, the ITC released ‘High Speed Rail and Connected Cities: Accessible Places for Growing Economies’, at a launch in Leeds Town Hall…


Infrastructure Intelligence, Denise Chevrin – 18 May 2016

Good timing – ITC underlines importance of HS2 in the North

A new report from the Independent Transport Commission sets out how the benefits of High Speed 2 (HS2) can be captured by the city regions it will serve. The report comes amidst reports that the second phase of the high speed line to Manchester and Leeds is being scrutinized by government for budget savings including potentially cutting stations that could harm growth in the North.


Buying Business Travel, Rob Gill – 17 May 2016

HS2 construction to start in 2017 – minister

Transport secretary Patrick McLoughlin has confirmed that construction will start on the HS2 rail link next year. McLoughlin used a speech in Leeds to dismiss media reports about HS2’s future and stressed that work would start on the controversial rail project in 2017. The first phase of HS2 will link London’s Euston with Birmingham by 2026 before a second phase of high-speed track will branch out in a Y-shape from the West Midlands to both Manchester and Leeds by 2033.


City A.M., James Nickerson – 16 May 2016

British cities and regions need to seize the opportunity provided by HS2, says Independent Transport Commission

British cities and regions should seize the opportunity provided by HS2 to generate economic growth, according to a new report. The study by the Independent Transport Commission found that there could be social and economic benefits brought by HS2, and that British cities should jump on the once-in-a-generation public infrastructure investment project to propel growth.


The Yorkshire Post – 16 May 2016

Transport links could be hit by mayoral deal

Andrew Adonis, who was handed the NIC role by George Osborne in October 2015 to counter longstanding suggestions that infrastructure investment is biased in favour of the capital, has reportedly been offered a key role by Boris Johnson’s successor Sadiq Khan, the newly-elected Mayor of London… Meanwhile a report by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) lays out a number of key recommendations to help Leeds and other cities maximise on the economic and urban growth potential HS2 will bring.


The Yorkshire Post, Aisha Iqbal – 16 May 2016

Bye bye trolleybus, hello HS2: Why high-speed rail is key to better public transport in Leeds, and vice versa

A transport system to truly unite the cities of the North into a single political powerhouse and give London and other European metropoles a run for their money. But a transport system that ultimately has its users at its heart, and will galvanise public confidence. That’s the double dream that Leeds and its neighbours should be aiming for as the journey to HS2 gathers pace, experts and policymakers have been told. They were meeting earlier today (Monday) at Leeds Town Hall for the launch of a major report investigating how the Government’s planned HS2 high-speed rail link will shape the country’s cities and regions.


Yorkshire Evening Post – 16 May 2016

Commission urges cities to plan for HS2

CIties need to plan now to enjoy the benefits of the proposed HS2 rail line, according to a report to be launched in Leeds today (Monday). The Independent Transport Commission thinktank warns high speed rail alone will not have a major impact on the economy and cities need to have plans in place that maximise the benefits.


The Planner, Laura Edgar – 16 May 2016

Cities and regions need to seize HS2 opportunities, says think tank

High Speed Rail & Connected Cities also says that British cities and regions need to “seize the opportunity” to maximise value from “this once-in-a-generation public infrastructure investment project”. The project, said ITC, aimed to investigate how HS2 will shape the country’s cities and regions, with a number of workshops held throughout 2015. It also considered high-speed rail in Europe. Launched today (16 May) in Leeds, the report reviews current proposals for each of the city regions that will be served by HS2 and sets out guidance on how to “enhance the process of urban changed” by maximising the social and economic benefits that stem from developing an integrated transport system, according to ITC.


Move Commercial, Natasha Young – 16 May 2016

Government reaffirms commitment to HS2 in the North West

The Secretary of State for Transport has reaffirmed the government’s commitment to delivering high speed rail in the North West during a speech this week. Speaking in Leeds to launch an Independent Transport Commission (ITC) report into HS2, Rt Hon Patrick McLoughlin MP has insisted the new infrastructure project will go ahead despite reports of doubts.


Telegraph and Argus, Claire Wilde – 16 May 2016

Yorkshire should summon spirit of Grand Depart to make high-speed rail a success, think tank says

Yorkshire should summon the spirit behind its Tour de France Grand Départ to make the arrival of high-speed rail an economic success, a think tank has said. The Leeds City Region – of which Bradford is a part – needs a long-term brand to capitalise on the arrival of the HS2 link, according to a new report by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC).


Transport Network, Chris Ames – 29 April 2016

Children are ‘neglected’ in transport policy and provision

Independent travel by children is falling and often actively discouraged, leaving children ‘neglected in transport provision’, a new report argues. Children and Travel, a paper from think tank the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) says that children are travelling much less independently than 40 years ago, and child walking has declined dramatically, replaced with travel by car.


Road Safety GB – 29 April 2016

Report highlights ‘dramatic decline’ in levels of walking among children

A new report by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) has highlighted a ‘dramatic decline’ in the levels of walking among children, in part due to concerns about road safety. The report, ‘Children and Travel’, has uncovered ‘striking changes’ in children’s travel with the balance of power shifting from walking to travelling by car. Authored by social research expert Kris Beuret OBE, the report also found that children are travelling much less independently than 40 years ago.


The Times, Graeme Paton – 28 April 2016

Children are chaperoned to school

(Subscription required) Only a quarter of children travel alone to primary school, compared with nine out of ten in the 1970s, a study has found. The sharp decline has been blamed on the difficulty of finding places at nearby primary schools, as well as parental fears over “stranger danger”. Almost two thirds of outings by children, including leisure and shopping trips, are made with an adult, up from four in ten a generation ago, the report commissioned by the Independent Transport Commission said.


Infrastructure Intelligence – 23 March 2016

Third of motorists receptive to road payments

A survey carried out on behalf of the Independent Transport Commission, indicates that one-third of motorists are receptive to new forms of funding to pay for roads and their upkeep. Over 2,200 people took part in the survey from all parts of the UK representing a mix of commuters, rural and urban residents, drivers and non-drivers, high and low mileage drivers, men and women, employment status, retired and different ages.


Transport Network, Chris Ames – 22 March 2016

Majority support road charging to fill financial ‘black hole’

A majority of the public are open to various forms of road user charging, a transport think tank has claimed. The Independent Transport Commission (ITC) said its research found that 65% of people polled supported some new form of paying for road use ‘in the light of declining revenue from fuel duty’ – however the figure includes the 11% who expressed a preference for an increase in general tax.


Highways – 22 March 2016

Public supports road user charging, research finds

Motorists would consider new forms of road user charging, according to a report by leading think tank Independent Transport Commission (ITC). Given the apparent public hostility to any suggestion of road user charging ITC has sought to uncover just what the public really think when presented with the facts and a range of possible solutions.


HighwaysIndustry.com – 21 March 2016

Think-tank reveals support for UK road charging measures

Britain’s motorists would support some new form of charging to use the roads, according to a transport think-tank that has called on the government to reconsider the policy as fuel tax revenues fall. A report by the Independent Transport Commission found that 65 per cent of 2,250 those surveyed would back some new form of paying for road use, even though the idea has long been a controversial one with UK motorists.


RUC Magazine – 21 March 2016

Don’t rule out road pricing, says think tank (UK)

UK motorists would be in favour of potential road use charging for the road network according to a new report by a transport think tank. The report, delivered by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC), found that roughly 65 percent of those surveyed (2,250 people from across the UK demographic) supported the concept of a new form of paying for road use, long seen as a controversial vote loser within UK political circles.


Financial Times, Tanya Powley – 20 March 2016

Think-tank reveals support for UK road charging measures

(Subscription required) Britain’s motorists would support some new form of charging to use the roads, according to a transport think-tank that has called on the government to reconsider the policy as fuel tax revenues fall. A report by the Independent Transport Commission found that 65 per cent of 2,250 those surveyed would back some new form of paying for road use, even though the idea has long been a controversial one with UK motorists. According to the ITC, no options for road charging were completely rejected, although the highest support, at 26 per cent of those polled, was for a peak-time charge on congested motorways.


Aviation Environment Federation – 11 March 2016

The AEF view: ITC report on the sustainability of UK aviation

A new report published this week (7th March) by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC), a think tank supported by Heathrow and Gatwick Airports, has argued that environmental concerns should not prevent a new runway being built. In this blog, AEF takes a look at the report, ‘The sustainability of UK aviation: trends in the mitigation of noise and emissions’, and considers its merits on noise, CO2 emissions and local air pollution.


GetWestLondon, Robert Cumber – 8 March 2016

Heathrow could expand without adding to pollution, suggests new report

Heathrow welcomes the Independent Transport Commission’s report, but campaigners dismiss it as ‘ivory tower research’. A third runway at Heathrow could be built without adding to noise or pollution, according to a new report. But campaigners fighting expansion of the airport have branded the findings “ivory tower research” and say the authors are “not living in the real world”. The Independent Transport Commission (ITC), which commissioned the study, claims it shows concerns over noise, CO2 emissions and local air quality should not prevent a new runway being built at either Heathrow or Gatwick.


Energy Live News, Jacqueline Echevarria – 8 March 2016

Technologies ‘will mitigate environmental impact of airport expansion’

Technological improvements will mitigate any future environmental impact of an extra runway at Heathrow or Gatwick. That’s according to a report from the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) which added technologies have been quick in mitigating increases in noise, CO2 and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) emissions in the past 30 years and they will continue to do so.


The Times, Graeme Paton – 7 March 2016

Heathrow pollution concerns rejected

(Subscription required) Heathrow’s bid for a third runway has been boosted by a study that found concerns over noise and pollution were not insurmountable. Independent Transport Commission research said that ministers could no longer use environmental barriers as an excuse to block the airport’s expansion.


BBC News – 7 March 2016

Heathrow third runway: Environmental concerns ‘should not stop expansion’

Concerns over the environmental impact of expanding Gatwick or Heathrow should not lead to aviation plans being rejected, according to a think tank. The Independent Transport Commission (ITC) said research showed there had been “rapid” progress on aircraft noise and emissions over the past 30 years.


ITV News – 7 March 2016

New report: another runway would not mean more noise and emissions

(Video) A new report claims another runway would not mean more noise and emissions. There was fury under the Heathrow and Gatwick flightpaths today after a new report said another runway would not mean more noise and emissions. It’s claimed new environmentally friendly planes, changes to the way they fly and more people travelling by train will lead to no worse effects for hundreds of thousands of people.


Transport Network, Chris Ames – 7 March 2016

Pollution shouldn’t ‘stop the show’ on airports, researchers say

A new report says that concerns around noise, carbon emissions (CO2) and local air quality ‘do not need to be a show-stopper’ for the expansion of either Gatwick or Heathrow airports. The sustainability of UK Aviation by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) argues, based on ‘rapid’ improvements over the past 30 years, that technological improvements will mitigate future increases in noise, CO2 and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.


Business Reporter – 7 March 2016

Airport expansion environmental challenges can be tackled, says report

Expansion of Heathrow or Gatwick should not be rejected on environmental grounds as progress on mitigating the impact of air travel is likely to continue, according to a new study. Research by the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) claimed there have been “rapid” improvements on aircraft noise, carbon emissions and nitrogen oxide pollution due to aviation over the past 30 years.


Digital Look, Josh White – 7 March 2016

Tech advances could mitigate third runway pollution, report suggests

Environmental campaigners were dealt a blow by an independent transport think-tank on Monday, with a new report suggesting technical improvements would mitigate any environmental effects of a new runway being built at Heathrow or Gatwick. The Independent Transport Commission said in the report that it agreed environmental concerns were worth further attention, but believed future technological improvements would offset any future increases in CO2 and nitrogen oxide emissions arising from airport expansion.


International Airport Review, Katie Sadler – 7 March 2016

ITC report finds environmental challenges should not hinder expansion

An Independent Transport Commission (ITC) published report has found concerns around noise and carbon emissions should not stop UK airport expansion. A report published by the Independent Transport Commission, “The sustainability of UK Aviation: Trends in the mitigation of noise and emissions“, has found ‘concerns around noise, carbon emissions (CO2) and local air quality that arise from aviation operations do not need to be a show-stopper for the UK’s pursuit of airport capacity enhancements at either Gatwick or Heathrow.’


Edie, Matt Mace – 7 March 2016

Green technology could mitigate environmental impacts of Heathrow expansion

(Subscription required) Technological advancements will mitigate the environmental impacts, such as noise and air pollution, of the controversial third runway developed at Heathrow, a new report from the Independent Transport Commission (ITC) has found.


Airqualitynews.com, Michael Holder – 7 March 2016

UK airport air quality challenges ‘can be overcome’

Environmental concerns over air pollution, carbon emissions and noise from aviation operations should not be a “show stopper” for expanding either Heathrow or Gatwick airports, an Independent Transport Commission report argued today.


Travel Weekly, Phil Davies – 7 March 2016

Public opinion over new runway shifts towards Gatwick, claims study

A study by the Independent Transport Commission has found concerns over noise and pollution at Heathrow are not insurmountable. The research said that ministers could no longer use environmental barriers as an excuse to block the airport’s expansion.


Airport-technology.com – 7 March 2016

UK’s ITC report supports airport expansion plans at Gatwick or Heathrow

A report from the UK’s Independent Transport Commission (ITC) has reported that noise, carbon emissions (CO2) and local air quality issues should not hinder expansion plans at Gatwick or Heathrow airport. Titled ‘The sustainability of UK Aviation: Trends in the mitigation of noise and emissions’, the report states that there have been significant improvements made to alleviate noise, CO2 and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions caused due to flight movements.


eTurbo News – 7 March 2016

Experts: Air quality is no “show-stopper” to Heathrow expansion

Today, Heathrow welcomed the Independent Transport Commission’s (ITC) report “The Sustainability of UK Aviation: Trends in the mitigation of noise and emissions.” The report’s conclusions are unequivocal: environmental conditions are not a show-stopper to pursue airport expansion, including at Heathrow, given rapid technology improvements over the last 30 years which have reduced the British aviation industry’s impacts.


Rail Technology Magazine – 19 February 2016

Sheffield businesses call for independent review of HS2 hub options

During the event, held at the Memorial Hall, several guest speakers discussed the city’s options in a debate and Q&A session. One of those present was Henk Bouwman, who is currently working for the Independent Transport Commission consulting on the spatial impact of high-speed rail on UK cities. But he was speaking from a broader European capacity at the summit, sharing his experience of high-speed rail stations and infrastructure projects in Lille, Bordeaux and Rotterdam.


Sheffield Telegraph – 18 February 2016

HS2 Summit: Hundreds urge Government to choose station based on jobs

The event at the City Hall was part of a Star-backed campaign for an HS2 stop in the city centre. Figures show it would create 6,500 more jobs than the Government’s choice of Meadowhall. Chamber chief Richard Wright called for a report by the Independent Transport Commission on “the greatest economic impact and return on investment.” He added: “We could get this horribly wrong. Local authorities and MPs are fighting like cats and dogs. Business can rise above that, but we have to do it quickly. If we can get enough business strength behind this they can’t ignore us, there would be too much political fall out.